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Posts Tagged ‘23andMe’

meme23andmedudeohyeahmeme

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American Omic

funkyamericangothic

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legarement

The “T” allele of rs1378810 in your DNAJC13 gene has been associated with a slight benefit (less than 0.4% variance) in general cognitive ability. You can check your 23andMe profile.*  What? You’re a TT? Ooooh … nobody is impressed. But let’s not make light of our DNAJ genes just yet.

Consider the critical role of DNAJC5, a so-called cysteine-string protein (because it encodes a protein with an array of cysteine residues). This protein helps synaptic vesicles fuse and un-fuse so that your neurons can release and re-cycle tiny packets of neurotransmitters – which is how neurons send signals to one another. Yeah, vesicle fusion is really important … and is happening like a quadriillion times right now in your brain.

Mutations in the cysteine string of DNAJC5 have been associated with Huntington’s disease.

[artwork credit]

*Interpreting 23andMe data here can be confusing because 23andMe lists an A or T as possible alleles but one isn’t always sure which strand the research literature refers to and if that strand is the same strand that 23andMe is reading from. Luckily SNPedia points out that an rs1378810 TT is in tight linkage disequilibrium with rs2133692 TT (T or C alleles) so you can check this genotype on 23andMe to infer your rs1378810 genotype. My 23andMe profile says AA at rs1378810 and TT at rs2133692, so I think I have the slightly beneficial TT genotype … but I’m really not sure. Confused? Me too. But like the research suggests, this genotype really doesn’t add much to one’s general cognitive ability.

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Colm O’Dushlaine rocked his 23andMe profile … hard! … and then shared it with the world.

Totally. Awesome.

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Check out the Interpretome! developed by students and staff at Stanford University.

- I have 17 European alleles and 3 East Asian alleles … the genetic proof is in … white boys can’t jump.
– I have 17 out of 32 Type 2 Diabetes risk alleles … put down those carbs now … and 19 out of 30 Coronary Artery Disease risk alleles … and go for a jog.
– I have a combined Risk of Narcolepsy: 2.92 … but the score jumps to 85 with an issue of GENETICS in my hand.
- I’m not exactly on the leading edge of human evolution … a 72/110 of positive selection score.
- I’d better start saving for a long-ass retirement … probability of extreme longevity: 78.2

More on the interpretome here, here and here!

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Wobble base pair guanine uracil (GU)

Image via Wikipedia

Hands shake and wobble as the decades pass … moreso in some.

A recently evolved “T” allele (rs12720208) in the  3′ untranslated region (3′ UTR) of the FGF20 gene has been implicated in the risk of Parkinson’s Disease … namely by creating a wobbly G:U base-pair between microRNA-433 (miR-433) and the FGF20 transcript.  Since the normal function of microRNA-433 is to repress translation of proteins (such as FGF20), it is suspected that the PD risk “T” allele carriers make relatively more FGF20 … which, in turn … leads to the production of higher levels of alpha-synuclein (the main component of Lewy body fibrils, a pathological marker of diseases such as PD).  This newly evolved T-allele has also been associated with brain structural differences in healthy individuals.

My hands will shake and wobble as the decades pass … but not because I carry the G:U wobble pairing between miR-433:FGF20.  My 23andMe profile shows that I carry 2 C alleles and will produce the thermodynamically favorable G:C pairing.  Something to keep in mind as I lose my mind in the decades to come.

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“Listen Eric, you should think about how useful your newfangled Personal Genome is going to be.  There are a lot of reasons why all this information doesn’t tell you much”

“For example, have you thought about epigenetic effects that might be environmentally induced and can be transmitted across multiple subsequent generations?  Genotypes of individuals in previous generations might even be a better predictor of phenotype than an individual’s own genotype.”

“I know that Copy-Number Polymorphic (CNP) duplications are highly variable among individual and are considered inaccessible by most existing genotyping and sequencing technologies, but I’m still getting my genome sequenced anyway.”

“Can you please help Eric understand that rare variants and large variants (deletions, duplications and inversions) are individually rare, but collectively common in the human population might account for much more of heritability than common variation.  Nothing is known about these rare variants!”

“Yeah, Eric doesn’t realize that a very large number of closely linked genes can exhibit context-dependent and non-additive effects.”

“Gene by environment innnterraaaaactiiooon … coooool.”

–real science here.

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